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Alzheimer’s

Kondor Pharma Presents Its Clinical Trial Data on Alzheimer’s Patients

Dr. Laurent Balenci, COO of Kondor Pharma today presented the result of our pilot clinical trial of Inflawell on patients with mild and moderate Alzheimer’s disease (AD), at the 3rd Canadian Neuroscience Innovation Summit. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial on 80 Alzheimer’s patients indicated significant improvement in memory and cognition in Inflawell group compared to the placebo. Furthermore, the patients taking Inflawell showed significant improvement in the levels of peripheral Amyloid-ß 42/40 ratio and inflammation biomarkers. The patients took Inflawell or placebo along with their regular dose of Acetychloinesterase inhibitor drugs for 6 months.
We are pleased to report such promising clinical results and believe that Inflawell might provide a safe adjunct natural therapy to help with managing memory loss in Alzheimer’s or aging-associated mild cognitive impairment, said Dr. Ali Riazi, Co-founder, and CEO of Kondor Pharma. Our analyses of inflammation biomarkers in the treatment group suggest that the mode of action is likely through reduction or inhibition of certain inflammation pathways.

Chronic Inflammation has been emerging as a cause or a major contributing factor in many conditions associated with aging such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, arthritis, stroke, and cognitive decline, and dementia. The underlying inflammatory processes start many years before disease symptoms appear. Therefore, managing chronic inflammation in the brain has been proposed as a valid strategy to prevent diseases such as Alzheimer’s. For years researchers have been trying to treat Alzheimer’s by targeting Amyloid-ß and Tau proteins, but these attempts have been futile.

Kondor Pharma is currently looking for partners that are interested to help make Inflawell available globally. Together we can help prevent diseases through natural ways and before they lead to debilitating conditions including Alzheimer’s.

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